Books per Publisher: Data from the Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB)

Books per Publisher: Data from the Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB)

The Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB) is considered to be an important registry for quality-checked Open Access books – even if not all peer reviewed books are listed there. Two days ago, on 23.01.2018, I took a quick look at the ratio of books per publisher.

On that day, DOAB listed 254 publishers who had registered 10,502 books. The arithmetic mean was 41.35 books per publisher, the median was 10. Accordingly, the majority of publishers publish very few books. In fact, 92 publishers (36% of all listed publishers) reported five or less books.

On the other hand, 19 publishers (7,5% of all listed publishers) publish 5,373 books and thus more than half of the books reported (51%).

The extremely trivial data can be downloaded here as an OpenDocument file.

Published: „A landscape study on open access and monographs: Policies, funding and publishing in eight European countries“ 

As Niels Stern on the Goal Mailinglist the „biggest landscape study on the conditions and potentials for Open Access books yet has just been published“: A landscape study on open access and monographs: Policies, funding and publishing in eight European countries. 

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.815932

Some more information from the announcement: „The study builds on i.a. 73 in-depth conversations, conducted across eight different countries (Denmark, Finland, Germany, Netherlands, United Kingdom, France, Norway and Austria) to understand current developments among three stakeholder groups: Publishers, funders and libraries. The importance of author attitudes, scholarly reward and incentive systems is also raised throughout the study by numerous interviewees.

The report is authored by Eelco Ferwerda, Frances Pinter and Niels Stern and published by Knowledge Exchange http://www.knowledge-exchange.info/event/open-access-monographs. The study has been financed by Knowledge Exchange, FWF (Astria), CRIStin (Norway) and Couperin (France).“